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Bias haircut – everything you need to know about this classic shape

Jamie Harrison - June 15, 2017 Hair Cutting

Bias haircut – everything you need to know about this classic shape

One of the most popular hairdressing video tutorials on MHD is the Graduated Bias haircut by Graham Oglesby. A timeless and versatile shape since it first gained popularity in the 1990s, the Bias can be dressed in any number of ways thanks to the unique way it is cut.

Bias Haircut Inspiration

The name and technique comes from a fashion term of cutting cloth ‘on the bias’. The fabric is made woven with a horizontal and vertical weave at 90 degrees to each other. Cutting on the bias means to cut the cloth at a 45-degree angle to the weave, in other words, cut diagonally.

Cutting fabric on the bias

Cutting fabric on the bias

This technique is used by designers to add stretch and malleability to the fabric and can be moulded to shape. It’s used to accentuate the curves of the body and softly drape around those curves. This often means clothes may hang more gracefully or cling to the figure.

How that translates to hair

When applied to hair, the bias haircut incorporates a large area of disconnection on the top, which is cut in diagonal sections working from long to short from the back to the front.

This gives a curved interior with a pointed outline into the fringe, which allows fluidity and versatility in the final dressing.

Graham Oglesby’s Graduated Bias Haircut

Graham starts on his left-hand side with diagonal sections using a round graduation technique and repeats on the second side, crossing over in the centre-back to balance the internal shape with the curve of the head.

He works with diagonal sections in the back and crown running forwards to the right. He elevates the hair, over-directs, angles his fingers vertically, slightly twists and cuts from short to long which connects his crown area graduation on the left-hand side. Graham repeats the same process on the second side with reversed sectioning.

bias haircut top section

Use diagonal sections starting in the back from the left-hand side in the crown running forwards to the right. Repeat the same process on the second side.

bias haircut

The increased over-direction is a question of taste and desired result.

bias haircut corners

The crossing over of sections produces a corner that runs through the centre.

bias haircut

The front sections are disconnected due to the extreme over-direction. Refine the disconnected side areas, according to taste and trend.

The result is a classic tailored bias shape with a disconnected top featuring oblique angles for maximum movement and a variety of dressing options. By adjusting the length, you can easily adapt this classic shape to suit any client of any age!

Bias Haircut Dressing Option 1

Bias Haircut Dressing Option 1

Bias Haircut Dressing Option 2

Bias Haircut Dressing Option 2

Bias Haircut Dressing Option 3

Bias Haircut Dressing Option 3

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